Discussion:
"Thank you for your service" [barf]
(too old to reply)
Byker
2020-11-13 17:43:01 UTC
Permalink
It is not necessary to thank a veteran, but if the thanks is sincere, it
is usually appreciated. You might also consider that this practice came
about because as a nation we are embarrassed by the poor treatment of
those who had served in Vietnam, treatment given by you, Holman and those
like you.
And the regarding of Viet Vets as "baby killers" and walking time bombs
continued right up to 9/11, when it suddenly seemed to disappear
overnight...
Bill Flett
2020-11-13 18:23:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by Byker
It is not necessary to thank a veteran, but if the thanks is sincere, it
is usually appreciated. You might also consider that this practice came
about because as a nation we are embarrassed by the poor treatment of
those who had served in Vietnam, treatment given by you, Holman and those
like you.
And the regarding of Viet Vets as "baby killers" and walking time bombs
continued right up to 9/11, when it suddenly seemed to disappear
overnight...
What fucking bullshit.
a425couple
2020-11-14 00:38:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by Byker
It is not necessary to thank a veteran, but if the thanks is sincere, it
is usually appreciated. You might also consider that this practice came
about because as a nation we are embarrassed by the poor treatment of
those who had served in Vietnam, treatment given by you, Holman and those
like you.
And the regarding of Viet Vets as "baby killers" and walking time bombs
continued right up to 9/11, when it suddenly seemed to disappear
overnight...
Perhaps, for those who walked around with a
'chip on their shoulder'. I found that since about
90% of our age group did not serve, that most
people assumed one had not. The subject for
most, just did not come up.

But yes, after 9/11, much higher respect was
given.
Rudy Canoza
2020-11-14 01:07:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by a425couple
Post by Byker
It is not necessary to thank a veteran, but if the thanks is sincere, it
is usually appreciated. You might also consider that this practice came
about because as a nation we are embarrassed by the poor treatment of
those who had served in Vietnam, treatment given by you, Holman and those
like you.
And the regarding of Viet Vets as "baby killers" and walking time bombs
continued right up to 9/11, when it suddenly seemed to disappear
overnight...
Perhaps, for those who walked around with a
'chip on their shoulder'.  I found that since about
90% of our age group did not serve, that most
people assumed one had not.  The subject for
most, just did not come up.
But yes, after 9/11, much higher respect was
given.
Unwarranted.
a425couple
2020-11-14 18:06:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by Rudy Canoza
Post by a425couple
Post by Byker
It is not necessary to thank a veteran, but if the thanks is sincere, it
is usually appreciated. You might also consider that this practice came
about because as a nation we are embarrassed by the poor treatment of
those who had served in Vietnam, treatment given by you, Holman and those
like you.
And the regarding of Viet Vets as "baby killers" and walking time bombs
continued right up to 9/11, when it suddenly seemed to disappear
overnight...
Perhaps, for those who walked around with a
'chip on their shoulder'.  I found that since about
90% of our age group did not serve, that most
people assumed one had not.  The subject for
most, just did not come up.
But yes, after 9/11, much higher respect was
given.
Unwarranted.
I'm not sure what your cryptic one word answer
really meant, but I probably disagree.

After 9/11 (when over 3,000 American citizens, inside
the USA, were killed by foreigners) the average American
citizen realized that they owed some thanks for
their safety to the American military.
And extra of that respect went because it was
a dangerous job.
Rudy Canoza
2020-11-14 18:13:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by a425couple
Post by Rudy Canoza
Post by a425couple
Post by Byker
It is not necessary to thank a veteran, but if the thanks is sincere, it
is usually appreciated. You might also consider that this practice came
about because as a nation we are embarrassed by the poor treatment of
those who had served in Vietnam, treatment given by you, Holman and those
like you.
And the regarding of Viet Vets as "baby killers" and walking time bombs
continued right up to 9/11, when it suddenly seemed to disappear
overnight...
Perhaps, for those who walked around with a
'chip on their shoulder'.  I found that since about
90% of our age group did not serve, that most
people assumed one had not.  The subject for
most, just did not come up.
But yes, after 9/11, much higher respect was
given.
Unwarranted.
I'm not sure what your cryptic one word answer
really meant, but I probably disagree.
After 9/11 (when over 3,000 American citizens, inside
the USA, were killed by foreigners) the average American
citizen realized that they owed some thanks for
their safety to the American military.
That's really funny: the American military did *not* protect Americans'
safety on 9/11.
Ted
2020-11-15 09:17:38 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, 14 Nov 2020 10:06:34 -0800, a425couple
Post by a425couple
Post by Rudy Canoza
Post by a425couple
Post by Byker
It is not necessary to thank a veteran, but if the thanks is sincere, it
is usually appreciated. You might also consider that this
practice came
Post by a425couple
Post by Rudy Canoza
Post by a425couple
Post by Byker
about because as a nation we are embarrassed by the poor
treatment of
Post by a425couple
Post by Rudy Canoza
Post by a425couple
Post by Byker
those who had served in Vietnam, treatment given by you,
Holman and
Post by a425couple
Post by Rudy Canoza
Post by a425couple
Post by Byker
those
like you.
And the regarding of Viet Vets as "baby killers" and walking time bombs
continued right up to 9/11, when it suddenly seemed to disappear
overnight...
Perhaps, for those who walked around with a
'chip on their shoulder'.  I found that since about
90% of our age group did not serve, that most
people assumed one had not.  The subject for
most, just did not come up.
But yes, after 9/11, much higher respect was
given.
Unwarranted.
I'm not sure what your cryptic one word answer
really meant,
Because you're a tard.
Post by a425couple
but I probably disagree.
Because you're a tard.
Post by a425couple
After 9/11 (when over 3,000 American citizens, inside
the USA, were killed by foreigners) the average American
citizen realized that they owed some thanks for
their safety to the American military.
Yep. The military prevented the ragheads from flying planes into the
WTC. Dumbass.
Bud Frawley
2020-11-15 16:54:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by a425couple
Post by Byker
It is not necessary to thank a veteran, but if the thanks is >>>>
sincere, it
Post by a425couple
Post by Byker
is usually appreciated. You might also consider that this
practice came
Post by a425couple
Post by Byker
about because as a nation we are embarrassed by the poor
treatment of
Post by a425couple
Post by Byker
those who had served in Vietnam, treatment given by you,
Holman and
Post by a425couple
Post by Byker
those
like you.
And the regarding of Viet Vets as "baby killers" and walking
time bombs
Post by a425couple
Post by Byker
continued right up to 9/11, when it suddenly seemed to disappear
overnight...
Perhaps, for those who walked around with a
'chip on their shoulder'.  I found that since about
90% of our age group did not serve, that most
people assumed one had not.  The subject for
most, just did not come up.
But yes, after 9/11, much higher respect was
given.
Unwarranted.
I'm not sure what your cryptic one word answer
really meant,
Because you're a tard.
but I probably disagree.
Because you're a tard.
+1
After 9/11 (when over 3,000 American citizens, inside
the USA, were killed by foreigners) the average American
citizen realized that they owed some thanks for
their safety to the American military.
Yep. The military prevented the ragheads from flying planes into the WTC.
Dumbass.
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