Discussion:
Marines delay female fitness plan after over half fail
(too old to reply)
Dick Cockford
2014-01-04 22:13:32 UTC
Permalink
WASHINGTON (AP) — More than half of female Marines in boot camp
can't do three pullups, the minimum standard that was supposed
to take effect with the new year, prompting the Marine Corps to
delay the requirement, part of the process of equalizing
physical standards to integrate women into combat jobs.

The delay rekindled sharp debate in the military on the question
of whether women have the physical strength for some military
jobs, as service branches move toward opening thousands of
combat roles to them in 2016.

Although no new timetable has been set on the delayed physical
requirement, Marine Corps Commandant Gen. James Amos wants
training officials to "continue to gather data and ensure that
female Marines are provided with the best opportunity to
succeed," Capt. Maureen Krebs, a Marine spokeswoman, said
Thursday.

Starting with the new year, all female Marines were supposed to
be able to do at least three pullups on their annual physical
fitness test and eight for a perfect score. The requirement was
tested in 2013 on female recruits at Marine Corps Recruit Depot,
Parris Island, S.C., but only 45 percent of women met the
minimum, Krebs said.

The Marines had hoped to institute the pullups on the belief
that pullups require the muscular strength necessary to perform
common military tasks such as scaling a wall, climbing up a rope
or lifting and carrying heavy munitions.

Officials felt there wasn't a medical risk to putting the new
standard into effect as planned across the service, but that the
risk of losing recruits and hurting retention of women already
in the service was unacceptably high, she said.

Because the change is being put off, women will be able to
choose which test of upper-body strength they will be graded on
in their annual physical fitness test. Their choices:

• Pullups, with three the minimum. Three is also the minimum for
male Marines, but they need 20 for a perfect rating.

• A flexed-arm hang. The minimum is for 15 seconds; women get a
perfect score if they last for 70 seconds. Men don't do the hang
in their test.

Officials said training for pullups can change a person's
strength, while training for the flex-arm hang does little to
adapt muscular strength needed for military tasks

The delay on the standard could be another wrinkle in the plan
to begin allowing women to serve in jobs previously closed to
them such as infantry, armor and artillery units.

The military services are working to figure out how to move
women into newly opened jobs and have been devising updated
physical standards, training, education and other programs for
thousands of jobs they must open Jan. 1, 2016, said Navy Lt.
Cmdr. Nathan Christensen, a Defense Department spokesman. They
must open as many jobs to women as possible; if they decide to
keep some closed, they must explain why.

Military brass has said repeatedly that physical standards won't
be lowered to accommodate female applicants. Success for women
in training for the upcoming openings has come in fits and
starts.

In fall 2012, only two female Marines volunteered for the 13-
week infantry officers training course at Quantico, Va., and
both failed to complete it.

But the following fall, three Marines became the first women to
graduate from the Corps' enlisted infantry training school in
North Carolina. They completed the same test standards as the
men in the course, which included a 12-mile march with an 80-
pound pack and various combat fitness trials such as timed
ammunition container lifts and tests that simulate running under
combat fire.

Officials had added specific training for female recruits when
the pullup requirement was announced in December 2012, and they
came up with a workout program for women already serving.

Military testing for physical skill and stamina has changed over
the decades with needs of the armed forces. Officials say the
first recorded history of Marine Corps physical fitness tests,
for example, was 1908 when President Theodore Roosevelt ordered
that staff officers must ride horseback 90 miles and line
officers walk 50 miles over a three-day period to pass. A test
started in 1956 included chinups, pushups, broad jump, 50-yard
duck waddle and running.

The first test for women was started in 1969: A 120-yard shuttle
run, vertical jump, knee pushups, 600-yard run/walk and situps.

http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2014/01/02/marines-
female-fitness-pullups/4294313/

 
Mark Zeigfried
2014-01-07 03:34:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dick Cockford
WASHINGTON (AP) — More than half of female Marines in boot camp
can't do three pullups, the minimum standard that was supposed
to take effect with the new year, prompting the Marine Corps to
delay the requirement, part of the process of equalizing
physical standards to integrate women into combat jobs.
The delay rekindled sharp debate in the military on the question
of whether women have the physical strength for some military
jobs, as service branches move toward opening thousands of
combat roles to them in 2016.
Although no new timetable has been set on the delayed physical
requirement, Marine Corps Commandant Gen. James Amos wants
training officials to "continue to gather data and ensure that
female Marines are provided with the best opportunity to
succeed," Capt. Maureen Krebs, a Marine spokeswoman, said
Thursday.
Starting with the new year, all female Marines were supposed to
be able to do at least three pullups on their annual physical
fitness test and eight for a perfect score. The requirement was
tested in 2013 on female recruits at Marine Corps Recruit Depot,
Parris Island, S.C., but only 45 percent of women met the
minimum, Krebs said.
The Marines had hoped to institute the pullups on the belief
that pullups require the muscular strength necessary to perform
common military tasks such as scaling a wall, climbing up a rope
or lifting and carrying heavy munitions.
Officials felt there wasn't a medical risk to putting the new
standard into effect as planned across the service, but that the
risk of losing recruits and hurting retention of women already
in the service was unacceptably high, she said.
Because the change is being put off, women will be able to
choose which test of upper-body strength they will be graded on
• Pullups, with three the minimum. Three is also the minimum for
male Marines, but they need 20 for a perfect rating.
• A flexed-arm hang. The minimum is for 15 seconds; women get a
perfect score if they last for 70 seconds. Men don't do the hang
in their test.
Officials said training for pullups can change a person's
strength, while training for the flex-arm hang does little to
adapt muscular strength needed for military tasks
The delay on the standard could be another wrinkle in the plan
to begin allowing women to serve in jobs previously closed to
them such as infantry, armor and artillery units.
The military services are working to figure out how to move
women into newly opened jobs and have been devising updated
physical standards, training, education and other programs for
thousands of jobs they must open Jan. 1, 2016, said Navy Lt.
Cmdr. Nathan Christensen, a Defense Department spokesman. They
must open as many jobs to women as possible; if they decide to
keep some closed, they must explain why.
Military brass has said repeatedly that physical standards won't
be lowered to accommodate female applicants. Success for women
in training for the upcoming openings has come in fits and
starts.
In fall 2012, only two female Marines volunteered for the 13-
week infantry officers training course at Quantico, Va., and
both failed to complete it.
But the following fall, three Marines became the first women to
graduate from the Corps' enlisted infantry training school in
North Carolina. They completed the same test standards as the
men in the course, which included a 12-mile march with an 80-
pound pack and various combat fitness trials such as timed
ammunition container lifts and tests that simulate running under
combat fire.
Officials had added specific training for female recruits when
the pullup requirement was announced in December 2012, and they
came up with a workout program for women already serving.
Military testing for physical skill and stamina has changed over
the decades with needs of the armed forces. Officials say the
first recorded history of Marine Corps physical fitness tests,
for example, was 1908 when President Theodore Roosevelt ordered
that staff officers must ride horseback 90 miles and line
officers walk 50 miles over a three-day period to pass. A test
started in 1956 included chinups, pushups, broad jump, 50-yard
duck waddle and running.
The first test for women was started in 1969: A 120-yard shuttle
run, vertical jump, knee pushups, 600-yard run/walk and situps.
http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2014/01/02/marines-
female-fitness-pullups/4294313/
Why can't they do this? Are they too fat?
cloud dreamer
2014-01-07 16:12:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mark Zeigfried
WASHINGTON (AP) — More than half of female Marines in boot camp
can't do three pullups, the minimum standard that was supposed
to take effect with the new year, prompting the Marine Corps to
delay the requirement, part of the process of equalizing
physical standards to integrate women into combat jobs.
Why can't they do this? Are they too fat?
No. Female physiology is different from the males. In the military, I
could do a hundred sit ups with out breaking a sweat. I never saw a guy
come close to that.

But I couldn't do a pull up for the life of me.

To apply the exact same standards on men and women doesn't work. The
test is arbitrary. Not being able to do a pull up doesn't mean any more
to a woman's physical ability than a man not being able to do 100 sit ups.

There simply needs to be a physical test that caters to a woman's
physical makeup and one for men.

Not being able to do a pull up never affected my ability to do my job
and I could carry 100 lb pack 13 km just like the guys. I may not have
been first over the line, but I wasn't last...and those behind me were guys.

..
Obveeus
2014-01-07 16:26:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by cloud dreamer
Post by Mark Zeigfried
Post by Dick Cockford
WASHINGTON (AP) — More than half of female Marines in boot camp
can't do three pullups, the minimum standard that was supposed
to take effect with the new year, prompting the Marine Corps to
delay the requirement, part of the process of equalizing
physical standards to integrate women into combat jobs.
Why can't they do this? Are they too fat?
No. Female physiology is different from the males. In the military, I
could do a hundred sit ups with out breaking a sweat. I never saw a guy
come close to that.
But I couldn't do a pull up for the life of me.
To apply the exact same standards on men and women doesn't work. The test
is arbitrary. Not being able to do a pull up doesn't mean any more to a
woman's physical ability than a man not being able to do 100 sit ups.
The tests should be designed to measure skills useful in combat. Perhaps
climbing up something is much more likely to occur in combat that having to
sit up repeatedly?
Post by cloud dreamer
There simply needs to be a physical test that caters to a woman's physical
makeup and one for men.
No. The test should cater to the needs of the job. This is the same reason
that it makes no sense to change the testing/rules for firefighters to
something where certain candidates don't have to be able to lift a body off
the ground and carry it out of a building.
Lady Veteran
2014-01-08 04:01:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by Obveeus
Post by cloud dreamer
Post by Mark Zeigfried
Post by Dick Cockford
WASHINGTON (AP) — More than half of female Marines in boot camp
can't do three pullups, the minimum standard that was supposed
to take effect with the new year, prompting the Marine Corps to
delay the requirement, part of the process of equalizing
physical standards to integrate women into combat jobs.
Why can't they do this? Are they too fat?
No. Female physiology is different from the males. In the military, I
could do a hundred sit ups with out breaking a sweat. I never saw a guy
come close to that.
But I couldn't do a pull up for the life of me.
I managed 2 but couldn't to 3.

I also had to do a 5 minute hang-hanging by my hands-no fun but I did
that.
Post by Obveeus
Post by cloud dreamer
To apply the exact same standards on men and women doesn't work. The test
is arbitrary. Not being able to do a pull up doesn't mean any more to a
woman's physical ability than a man not being able to do 100 sit ups.
The tests should be designed to measure skills useful in combat. Perhaps
climbing up something is much more likely to occur in combat that having to
sit up repeatedly?
Sit ups need to be done to increase the strength of the core-for
stamina.
Post by Obveeus
Post by cloud dreamer
There simply needs to be a physical test that caters to a woman's physical
makeup and one for men.
No. The test should cater to the needs of the job. This is the same reason
that it makes no sense to change the testing/rules for firefighters to
something where certain candidates don't have to be able to lift a body off
the ground and carry it out of a building.
Yes-that is a skill that firefighters need.

LV
--
"I rode a tank and held a general's rank
When the blitzkrieg raged and the bodies stank."

---Sympathy for the Devil-The Rolling Stones

--------------------------------------------

If you are an idiot, I am your worst nightmare.
If you are a racist, fat-basher, bible thumper
or reTHUGlican,you would do well to avoid me at
all costs.

---------------------------------------------
BTR1701
2014-01-08 02:49:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by cloud dreamer
No. Female physiology is different from the males. In the military, I
could do a hundred sit ups with out breaking a sweat. I never saw a guy
come close to that.
Then you aren't paying attention. Many, many, many males can easily do a
hundred sit-ups. I can, and I'm not even in my youth anymore.
Post by cloud dreamer
To apply the exact same standards on men and women doesn't work. The
test is arbitrary. Not being able to do a pull up doesn't mean any more
to a woman's physical ability than a man not being able to do 100 sit ups.
Yes, it does, because as a soldier, she's more likely to encounter a
situation where she has to pull her body weight up and over something
than a man would be where he has to sit up over and over and over again.
trotsky
2014-01-08 12:34:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by BTR1701
Post by cloud dreamer
No. Female physiology is different from the males. In the military, I
could do a hundred sit ups with out breaking a sweat. I never saw a guy
come close to that.
Then you aren't paying attention. Many, many, many males can easily do a
hundred sit-ups. I can, and I'm not even in my youth anymore.
...said the anonyshit.
--
My biggest complaint about Republicans: shouldn't the sky be able to
fall only once?
Obveeus
2014-01-08 14:28:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by trotsky
Post by BTR1701
Post by cloud dreamer
No. Female physiology is different from the males. In the military, I
could do a hundred sit ups with out breaking a sweat. I never saw a guy
come close to that.
Then you aren't paying attention. Many, many, many males can easily do a
hundred sit-ups. I can, and I'm not even in my youth anymore.
...said the anonyshit.
Give him a break. You have no idea how hard it was for him to admit here
that he has a woman's body structure.
trotsky
2014-01-08 14:48:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by Obveeus
Post by trotsky
Post by BTR1701
Post by cloud dreamer
No. Female physiology is different from the males. In the military, I
could do a hundred sit ups with out breaking a sweat. I never saw a guy
come close to that.
Then you aren't paying attention. Many, many, many males can easily do a
hundred sit-ups. I can, and I'm not even in my youth anymore.
...said the anonyshit.
Give him a break. You have no idea how hard it was for him to admit here
that he has a woman's body structure.
Okay, you got me on that one.
--
My biggest complaint about Republicans: shouldn't the sky be able to
fall only once?
cloud dreamer
2014-01-08 15:20:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by trotsky
Post by Obveeus
Post by trotsky
Post by BTR1701
Post by cloud dreamer
No. Female physiology is different from the males. In the military, I
could do a hundred sit ups with out breaking a sweat. I never saw a guy
come close to that.
Then you aren't paying attention. Many, many, many males can easily do a
hundred sit-ups. I can, and I'm not even in my youth anymore.
...said the anonyshit.
Give him a break. You have no idea how hard it was for him to admit here
that he has a woman's body structure.
Okay, you got me on that one.
Yeah...it's only Jan 8th and he already has the Post of the Year.

LOLOLOL

..
trotsky
2014-01-08 15:29:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by cloud dreamer
Post by trotsky
Post by Obveeus
Post by trotsky
Post by BTR1701
Post by cloud dreamer
No. Female physiology is different from the males. In the military, I
could do a hundred sit ups with out breaking a sweat. I never saw a guy
come close to that.
Then you aren't paying attention. Many, many, many males can easily do a
hundred sit-ups. I can, and I'm not even in my youth anymore.
...said the anonyshit.
Give him a break. You have no idea how hard it was for him to admit here
that he has a woman's body structure.
Okay, you got me on that one.
Yeah...it's only Jan 8th and he already has the Post of the Year.
LOLOLOL
Hey, I'm just getting warmed up.
--
My biggest complaint about Republicans: shouldn't the sky be able to
fall only once?
cloud dreamer
2014-01-08 15:19:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by Obveeus
Post by trotsky
Post by BTR1701
Post by cloud dreamer
No. Female physiology is different from the males. In the military, I
could do a hundred sit ups with out breaking a sweat. I never saw a guy
come close to that.
Then you aren't paying attention. Many, many, many males can easily do a
hundred sit-ups. I can, and I'm not even in my youth anymore.
...said the anonyshit.
Give him a break. You have no idea how hard it was for him to admit here
that he has a woman's body structure.
Baaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaahahahahahahahahahahahahaaha....

..
Clarence Forthe
2014-01-13 20:39:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by cloud dreamer
Post by Obveeus
Post by trotsky
Post by BTR1701
Post by cloud dreamer
No. Female physiology is different from the males. In the military, I
could do a hundred sit ups with out breaking a sweat. I never saw a guy
come close to that.
Then you aren't paying attention. Many, many, many males can easily do a
hundred sit-ups. I can, and I'm not even in my youth anymore.
...said the anonyshit.
Give him a break. You have no idea how hard it was for him to admit here
that he has a woman's body structure.
Baaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaahahahahahahahahahahahahaaha....
Why are you laughing? You and Barack Obama both have vaginas -
and his gets used more than yours.
cloud dreamer
2014-01-14 13:49:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by Clarence Forthe
Post by cloud dreamer
Post by Obveeus
Post by trotsky
Post by BTR1701
Post by cloud dreamer
No. Female physiology is different from the males. In the military, I
could do a hundred sit ups with out breaking a sweat. I never saw a guy
come close to that.
Then you aren't paying attention. Many, many, many males can easily do a
hundred sit-ups. I can, and I'm not even in my youth anymore.
...said the anonyshit.
Give him a break. You have no idea how hard it was for him to admit here
that he has a woman's body structure.
Baaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaahahahahahahahahahahahahaaha....
Why are you laughing? You and Barack Obama both have vaginas -
and his gets used more than yours.
What are you? 5?

Cause the last time I heard that was from a first grader thinking he
knew what he was talking about and thought it made him look cool.

..

BTR1701
2014-01-08 20:11:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by trotsky
Post by BTR1701
Post by cloud dreamer
No. Female physiology is different from the males. In the military, I
could do a hundred sit ups with out breaking a sweat. I never saw a guy
come close to that.
Then you aren't paying attention. Many, many, many males can easily do a
hundred sit-ups. I can, and I'm not even in my youth anymore.
...said the anonyshit.
Give him a break. You have no idea how hard it was for him to admit here
that he has a woman's body structure.
Oh, please. Only if you take the provably stupid clod at her word that even
men in good shape can't do 100 sit-ups, and that such ability is
exclusively a female characteristic.

I guarantee you that most every NFL football player and NBA basketball
player can crank out 100 sit-ups without breaking a sweat. So can most of
the more average non-pro-athletes I know. Wasn't it Deion Sanders or
someone like that who used to be famous for doing 1000 sit-ups every day?
If you think that's evidence of a female body structure, your lovelife must
be quite amusing to behold.

It is, however, amusing to see that you've gotten down off your high horse
and are wallowing down here with rest of us and posting off-topic again.
I'm sure you have a reason all lined up as to why you're nevertheless not a
hypocrite.
Lady Veteran
2014-01-08 03:56:43 UTC
Permalink
On Tue, 7 Jan 2014 03:34:58 +0000 (UTC), Mark Zeigfried
Post by Mark Zeigfried
Post by Dick Cockford
WASHINGTON (AP) — More than half of female Marines in boot camp
can't do three pullups, the minimum standard that was supposed
to take effect with the new year, prompting the Marine Corps to
delay the requirement, part of the process of equalizing
physical standards to integrate women into combat jobs.
The delay rekindled sharp debate in the military on the question
of whether women have the physical strength for some military
jobs, as service branches move toward opening thousands of
combat roles to them in 2016.
Although no new timetable has been set on the delayed physical
requirement, Marine Corps Commandant Gen. James Amos wants
training officials to "continue to gather data and ensure that
female Marines are provided with the best opportunity to
succeed," Capt. Maureen Krebs, a Marine spokeswoman, said
Thursday.
Starting with the new year, all female Marines were supposed to
be able to do at least three pullups on their annual physical
fitness test and eight for a perfect score. The requirement was
tested in 2013 on female recruits at Marine Corps Recruit Depot,
Parris Island, S.C., but only 45 percent of women met the
minimum, Krebs said.
The Marines had hoped to institute the pullups on the belief
that pullups require the muscular strength necessary to perform
common military tasks such as scaling a wall, climbing up a rope
or lifting and carrying heavy munitions.
Officials felt there wasn't a medical risk to putting the new
standard into effect as planned across the service, but that the
risk of losing recruits and hurting retention of women already
in the service was unacceptably high, she said.
Because the change is being put off, women will be able to
choose which test of upper-body strength they will be graded on
• Pullups, with three the minimum. Three is also the minimum for
male Marines, but they need 20 for a perfect rating.
• A flexed-arm hang. The minimum is for 15 seconds; women get a
perfect score if they last for 70 seconds. Men don't do the hang
in their test.
Officials said training for pullups can change a person's
strength, while training for the flex-arm hang does little to
adapt muscular strength needed for military tasks
The delay on the standard could be another wrinkle in the plan
to begin allowing women to serve in jobs previously closed to
them such as infantry, armor and artillery units.
The military services are working to figure out how to move
women into newly opened jobs and have been devising updated
physical standards, training, education and other programs for
thousands of jobs they must open Jan. 1, 2016, said Navy Lt.
Cmdr. Nathan Christensen, a Defense Department spokesman. They
must open as many jobs to women as possible; if they decide to
keep some closed, they must explain why.
Military brass has said repeatedly that physical standards won't
be lowered to accommodate female applicants. Success for women
in training for the upcoming openings has come in fits and
starts.
In fall 2012, only two female Marines volunteered for the 13-
week infantry officers training course at Quantico, Va., and
both failed to complete it.
But the following fall, three Marines became the first women to
graduate from the Corps' enlisted infantry training school in
North Carolina. They completed the same test standards as the
men in the course, which included a 12-mile march with an 80-
pound pack and various combat fitness trials such as timed
ammunition container lifts and tests that simulate running under
combat fire.
Officials had added specific training for female recruits when
the pullup requirement was announced in December 2012, and they
came up with a workout program for women already serving.
Military testing for physical skill and stamina has changed over
the decades with needs of the armed forces. Officials say the
first recorded history of Marine Corps physical fitness tests,
for example, was 1908 when President Theodore Roosevelt ordered
that staff officers must ride horseback 90 miles and line
officers walk 50 miles over a three-day period to pass. A test
started in 1956 included chinups, pushups, broad jump, 50-yard
duck waddle and running.
The first test for women was started in 1969: A 120-yard shuttle
run, vertical jump, knee pushups, 600-yard run/walk and situps.
http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2014/01/02/marines-
female-fitness-pullups/4294313/
Why can't they do this? Are they too fat?
I know this will blow your one-track mind, but NO. They have little to
no developed upper body strength. I think it is due to girls being
kept away from body building sports-either by their peers or parents.

This does not mean they cannot develop this strength-it simply means
that they don't have it now.

LV
--
"I rode a tank and held a general's rank
When the blitzkrieg raged and the bodies stank."

---Sympathy for the Devil-The Rolling Stones

--------------------------------------------

If you are an idiot, I am your worst nightmare.
If you are a racist, fat-basher, bible thumper
or reTHUGlican,you would do well to avoid me at
all costs.

---------------------------------------------
Mitchell Holman
2014-01-08 13:59:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lady Veteran
On Tue, 7 Jan 2014 03:34:58 +0000 (UTC), Mark Zeigfried
Post by Mark Zeigfried
Post by Dick Cockford
WASHINGTON (AP) — More than half of female Marines in boot camp
can't do three pullups, the minimum standard that was supposed
to take effect with the new year, prompting the Marine Corps to
delay the requirement, part of the process of equalizing
physical standards to integrate women into combat jobs.
The delay rekindled sharp debate in the military on the question
of whether women have the physical strength for some military
jobs, as service branches move toward opening thousands of
combat roles to them in 2016.
Although no new timetable has been set on the delayed physical
requirement, Marine Corps Commandant Gen. James Amos wants
training officials to "continue to gather data and ensure that
female Marines are provided with the best opportunity to
succeed," Capt. Maureen Krebs, a Marine spokeswoman, said
Thursday.
Starting with the new year, all female Marines were supposed to
be able to do at least three pullups on their annual physical
fitness test and eight for a perfect score. The requirement was
tested in 2013 on female recruits at Marine Corps Recruit Depot,
Parris Island, S.C., but only 45 percent of women met the
minimum, Krebs said.
The Marines had hoped to institute the pullups on the belief
that pullups require the muscular strength necessary to perform
common military tasks such as scaling a wall, climbing up a rope
or lifting and carrying heavy munitions.
Officials felt there wasn't a medical risk to putting the new
standard into effect as planned across the service, but that the
risk of losing recruits and hurting retention of women already
in the service was unacceptably high, she said.
Because the change is being put off, women will be able to
choose which test of upper-body strength they will be graded on
• Pullups, with three the minimum. Three is also the minimum for
male Marines, but they need 20 for a perfect rating.
• A flexed-arm hang. The minimum is for 15 seconds; women get a
perfect score if they last for 70 seconds. Men don't do the hang
in their test.
Officials said training for pullups can change a person's
strength, while training for the flex-arm hang does little to
adapt muscular strength needed for military tasks
The delay on the standard could be another wrinkle in the plan
to begin allowing women to serve in jobs previously closed to
them such as infantry, armor and artillery units.
The military services are working to figure out how to move
women into newly opened jobs and have been devising updated
physical standards, training, education and other programs for
thousands of jobs they must open Jan. 1, 2016, said Navy Lt.
Cmdr. Nathan Christensen, a Defense Department spokesman. They
must open as many jobs to women as possible; if they decide to
keep some closed, they must explain why.
Military brass has said repeatedly that physical standards won't
be lowered to accommodate female applicants. Success for women
in training for the upcoming openings has come in fits and
starts.
In fall 2012, only two female Marines volunteered for the 13-
week infantry officers training course at Quantico, Va., and
both failed to complete it.
But the following fall, three Marines became the first women to
graduate from the Corps' enlisted infantry training school in
North Carolina. They completed the same test standards as the
men in the course, which included a 12-mile march with an 80-
pound pack and various combat fitness trials such as timed
ammunition container lifts and tests that simulate running under
combat fire.
Officials had added specific training for female recruits when
the pullup requirement was announced in December 2012, and they
came up with a workout program for women already serving.
Military testing for physical skill and stamina has changed over
the decades with needs of the armed forces. Officials say the
first recorded history of Marine Corps physical fitness tests,
for example, was 1908 when President Theodore Roosevelt ordered
that staff officers must ride horseback 90 miles and line
officers walk 50 miles over a three-day period to pass. A test
started in 1956 included chinups, pushups, broad jump, 50-yard
duck waddle and running.
The first test for women was started in 1969: A 120-yard shuttle
run, vertical jump, knee pushups, 600-yard run/walk and situps.
http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2014/01/02/marines-
female-fitness-pullups/4294313/
Why can't they do this? Are they too fat?
I know this will blow your one-track mind, but NO. They have little to
no developed upper body strength. I think it is due to girls being
kept away from body building sports-either by their peers or parents.
Proof?
Lady Veteran
2014-01-08 15:45:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mitchell Holman
Post by Lady Veteran
On Tue, 7 Jan 2014 03:34:58 +0000 (UTC), Mark Zeigfried
Post by Mark Zeigfried
Post by Dick Cockford
WASHINGTON (AP) — More than half of female Marines in boot camp
can't do three pullups, the minimum standard that was supposed
to take effect with the new year, prompting the Marine Corps to
delay the requirement, part of the process of equalizing
physical standards to integrate women into combat jobs.
The delay rekindled sharp debate in the military on the question
of whether women have the physical strength for some military
jobs, as service branches move toward opening thousands of
combat roles to them in 2016.
Although no new timetable has been set on the delayed physical
requirement, Marine Corps Commandant Gen. James Amos wants
training officials to "continue to gather data and ensure that
female Marines are provided with the best opportunity to
succeed," Capt. Maureen Krebs, a Marine spokeswoman, said
Thursday.
Starting with the new year, all female Marines were supposed to
be able to do at least three pullups on their annual physical
fitness test and eight for a perfect score. The requirement was
tested in 2013 on female recruits at Marine Corps Recruit Depot,
Parris Island, S.C., but only 45 percent of women met the
minimum, Krebs said.
The Marines had hoped to institute the pullups on the belief
that pullups require the muscular strength necessary to perform
common military tasks such as scaling a wall, climbing up a rope
or lifting and carrying heavy munitions.
Officials felt there wasn't a medical risk to putting the new
standard into effect as planned across the service, but that the
risk of losing recruits and hurting retention of women already
in the service was unacceptably high, she said.
Because the change is being put off, women will be able to
choose which test of upper-body strength they will be graded on
• Pullups, with three the minimum. Three is also the minimum for
male Marines, but they need 20 for a perfect rating.
• A flexed-arm hang. The minimum is for 15 seconds; women get a
perfect score if they last for 70 seconds. Men don't do the hang
in their test.
Officials said training for pullups can change a person's
strength, while training for the flex-arm hang does little to
adapt muscular strength needed for military tasks
The delay on the standard could be another wrinkle in the plan
to begin allowing women to serve in jobs previously closed to
them such as infantry, armor and artillery units.
The military services are working to figure out how to move
women into newly opened jobs and have been devising updated
physical standards, training, education and other programs for
thousands of jobs they must open Jan. 1, 2016, said Navy Lt.
Cmdr. Nathan Christensen, a Defense Department spokesman. They
must open as many jobs to women as possible; if they decide to
keep some closed, they must explain why.
Military brass has said repeatedly that physical standards won't
be lowered to accommodate female applicants. Success for women
in training for the upcoming openings has come in fits and
starts.
In fall 2012, only two female Marines volunteered for the 13-
week infantry officers training course at Quantico, Va., and
both failed to complete it.
But the following fall, three Marines became the first women to
graduate from the Corps' enlisted infantry training school in
North Carolina. They completed the same test standards as the
men in the course, which included a 12-mile march with an 80-
pound pack and various combat fitness trials such as timed
ammunition container lifts and tests that simulate running under
combat fire.
Officials had added specific training for female recruits when
the pullup requirement was announced in December 2012, and they
came up with a workout program for women already serving.
Military testing for physical skill and stamina has changed over
the decades with needs of the armed forces. Officials say the
first recorded history of Marine Corps physical fitness tests,
for example, was 1908 when President Theodore Roosevelt ordered
that staff officers must ride horseback 90 miles and line
officers walk 50 miles over a three-day period to pass. A test
started in 1956 included chinups, pushups, broad jump, 50-yard
duck waddle and running.
The first test for women was started in 1969: A 120-yard shuttle
run, vertical jump, knee pushups, 600-yard run/walk and situps.
http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2014/01/02/marines-
female-fitness-pullups/4294313/
Why can't they do this? Are they too fat?
I know this will blow your one-track mind, but NO. They have little to
no developed upper body strength. I think it is due to girls being
kept away from body building sports-either by their peers or parents.
Proof?
Ask the Marines. This whole discussion is proof.

LV
--
"I rode a tank and held a general's rank
When the blitzkrieg raged and the bodies stank."

---Sympathy for the Devil-The Rolling Stones

--------------------------------------------

If you are an idiot, I am your worst nightmare.
If you are a racist, fat-basher, bible thumper
or reTHUGlican,you would do well to avoid me at
all costs.

---------------------------------------------
Continue reading on narkive:
Loading...